Research

Dr. Lesley Reid’s Research on Immigration Goes Viral

Dr. Robert Adelman, of the University at Buffalo [NY]; Gail Markle, of Kennesaw State University; Charles Jaret, of Georgia State University; Saskia Weiss, an independent scholar; and Dr. Lesley Reid, chair of the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Alabama, explored the links between immigration and crime. They sampled forty years of […]

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Dr. Josh Wakeham’s Work in Social Epistemology Appears in the Journal Sociological Theory

Dr. Josh Wakeham considers bullshit a problem of social epistemology in an article first published by Sociological Theory on 16 March 2017. An abstract appears below. The full text of the research is available online: http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0735275117692835 Bullshit is a widely recognized problem. While philosophy has given the topic some consideration, the analysis it offers is limited […]

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Doctoral Student Brad Barber & Dr. Bronwen Lichtenstein Work to Educate Parolees and Probationers about HIV

Dr. Bronwen Lichtenstein of the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice  and Social Work student Brad Barber have been working to close the educational gap created by diverting felons from prisons, which have HIV education class, into community programs. This population is at an unusually high risk of HIV and often lacks basic information about […]

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Dr. Bronwen Lichtenstein’s Research Provides Insights Into HIV Positive Adolescents’ Sexual Disclosure for Clinical Practice

Dr. Lichtenstein, in collaboration with Cynthia Rodgers, Lauren E. Bahr Marhefka, Marla D. Hinson, Dayna Cook-Heard, Stephen D. Rygiel, and Marsha S. Sturdevant, has authored an article “Two vignettes of adolescent sexual disclosure: guidance for HIV clinical practice” that appears in the current issue of Journal of Infection Prevention.  The article offers practical guidance for […]

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Dr. Adam Lankford Considers the Future of Technology in Policing

On Tuesday, July 12, Dr. Adam Lankford’s analysis of the potential for new technologies to reduce to obviate law enforcement’s use of deadly force while making arrests appeared on CNN’s website. A link to the article is below. http://www.cnn.com/2016/07/12/health/police-deadly-force-technology-solutions/ […]

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Dr. Jennifer Kenney’s Research Explores “Relationships between Adolescent Well-Being and Friend Support and Behavior”

The article, written in collaboration with Amy C. Traylor, Javonda D. Williams, and Laura M. Hopson, examines friend support and behavior, assessing for interdependent relationships with adolescent behavior and well-being. It appears in volume 38, issue 3 of Children & Schools: A Journal of the National Association of Social Workers. An abstract can be viewed online […]

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Lankford Publishes Research on Fame-seeking Rampage Shooters

A recent issue of the journal Aggression & Violent Behavior  features Professor Adam Lankford’s research into fame-seeking rampage shooters. He establishes that, although the phenomenon has been noted for forty years, it appears to have become more common in recent decades as fame has become revered as the ultimate form of prestige-bearing success and the distinction between […]

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Melendez, Lichtenstein, and Dolliver Author Article on Public Blame & Families of Mass Shooters

Former Criminal Justice Master’s student, Michael Melendez, and Professors Dr. Bronwen Lichtenstein and Dr. Matthew Dolliver have co-authored an article titled “Mothers of Mass Shooters: Exploring Public Blame for the Mothers of School Shooters through an Application of the Courtesy Stigma to the Columbine and Newtown Tragedies.” Following mass shootings such as those at Columbine […]

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Daniel Lockwood & Dr. Ariane Prohaska Investigate Police Attitudes Toward Domestic Violence

Dr. Prohaska and Daniel Lockwood, an alumnus of the Department of Criminal Justice, reviewed existing literature about police responses to intimate partner violence and the role officers’ gender plays in their responses, including arrest rates, criteria considered when making the decision to arrest, and whether  officers and victims of intimate partner violence have a preference […]

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Dr. Ida Johnson’s Research on Parolee Attitudes Appears in American Journal of Criminal Justice

Ida Johnson performed a qualitative analysis of parolee perceptions of their parole experience and their relationship with their parole officer using face to face interviews with sixty female parolees in a Southern state. Women interviewed had spent 7.5 years in prison on average and had been on parole from one to five years prior to the […]

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